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The geologist Carl Strutinski has started 2017 by releasing a new paper, Massenextinktionen aus Sicht der Hypothese eines wachsenden Erdballs (Mass extinctions with respect to the hypothesis of the expanding Earth), available as a free pdf.

Strutinski published papers last year about the Lilliput Effect, gravity and mass extinctions and he continues these thoughts in his new paper. The bulk of the new paper is in German but there is a comprehensive English abstract.
There is a “remarkable correlation [between supernovas], considered to stand for increasing boosts in gravity, and biotic crises on Earth”

Strutinski

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Skull of the armored fish Dunkleostus, one of the many extinct animals of the past. (from Wikipedia)

In contrast to some other expansionists, Strutinski believes there may be a connection between the rate of supernova explosions and mass extinctions. A supernova would increase the intensity of galactic cosmic rays, thereby causing a relatively rapid increase in the mass and surface gravity of the Earth. There is a “remarkable correlation [between supernovas], considered to stand for increasing boosts in gravity, and biotic crises on Earth” according to Strutinski.

Of course mass extinctions didn’t just happen to the dinosaurs. One of the most recent was the late Quaternary megafauna extinctions around 45,000 years ago. These huge animals lived alongside our human ancestors and scientists have been debating for decades about the mystery of their extinction. Two of the most popular suggestions for the disappearance of these giants has been climate change or human hunting. A recent study, Climate change not to blame for late Quaternary megafauna extinctions in Australia, presented evidence for the latter in the science periodical Nature. But why did the extinctions only affect mainly large life? The theory of a relatively rapid gravity change seems to account for the mass extinctions of large life as animals adjusted to gravity increase by decreasing in size.

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Related Pages

The Lilliput Effect, gravity and mass extinction
The Geological Society publishes Earth expansion paper
An index of Interesting Publications
Latest News Comments and Updates
Main Evidence for the Expanding Earth theory
A Brief History of the Expanding Earth theory

References

Strutinski, C. (2017). Massenextinktionen aus Sicht der Hypothese eines wachsenden Erdballs.
English abstract & Free pdf

Saltré, F., Rodríguez-Rey, M., Brook, B. W., Johnson, C. N., Turney, C. S., Alroy, J., ... & Gillespie, R. (2016). Climate change not to blame for late Quaternary megafauna extinctions in Australia. Nature communications, 7.
Abstract & Free pdf



Page first created   26 Jan 17
Page last updated  27 Jan 17